Travel Industry

 

Travel Personas

Americans are united in their under-vacationed behavior, but their challenges and motivations are different. Below you will find information about the barriers, travel personality, and vacation motivations of five key audiences to help refine your message.

Barriers
Business travelers are classic American workaholics. They are at a higher level and are driven by their careers, and vacation days are the collateral damage of their ambition.

Travel Personality
Business travelers want a more luxurious experience and they are willing to pay for it. They travel frequently and they are knowledgeable and more adventurous as a result.

Why They Travel
The career realities of business travelers forces them to miss out on moments with their families. With vacation time, they are looking to connect with the people they care about.

Barriers
Young professionals are at a critical stage in their careers. They have an intense desire to prove themselves at work, which they feel is in conflict with taking vacations.

Travel Personality
Vacation is a priority, but at this career stage, this group exists on shorter trips that are bigger on active experiences than relaxation. Planning travel can overwhelm them and they are more likely to seek help in creating their adventures.

Why They Travel
Young professionals want to make memories. They like a cool restaurant scene and want to experience new cultures, but they place the most value on experiences that will define them personally and strengthen bonds with friends and family.

Barriers
Older professionals are leaders in the workplace. They are established in their careers are are not concerned that taking a vacation will make them look less dedicated. They do, however, have less appetite to change behavior when it comes to the amount of vacation they take or how they take it.

Travel Personality
Older professionals know what they like and they like what they know. While they are open to trying new things, they prefer to do so in a familiar environment that takes their needs into consideration. This group is also the most concerned with healthy options on vacation.

Why They Travel
The older professional is just as likely to see travel as important as other generations, but the intensity of their motivation has lessened over time. At this stage of their lives, their focus is relaxation, not exploration.

Barriers
Parents of young children are in a tug-of-war between work and home. They have earned responsibility in their careers and are critical points for growth—a reality that does not always align with family needs. When they do travel, the logistics of traveling with their kids is their biggest challenge.

Travel Personality
This group wants practical, family-friendly experiences that serve as the foundation for family traditions—new or maintained. They are building memories and building their photo album (on Facebook and Instagram, for this social media-savvy audience).

Why They Travel
Making memories with their children drives this audience. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing their child’s face light up when they are doing something fun together. Also important is having a strong relationship with their significant other, which is often left out of family-centric messaging.

Barriers
Parents of older children begin to experience more freedom to travel, with or without kids, and have almost no heightened challenges. That is not to say they have no challenges—only that their barriers are on par with the average.

Travel Personality
For parents of older children, it is time to return to the more luxurious side of travel. Though they are still on a budget and want to save where possible, there is a heightened preference for nicer accommodations and experiences when they travel. They are also more likely to want help planning what they do.

Why They Travel
Travel is a matter of tradition and connection, allowing them to form closer bonds with their children and their significant other.